June 7, 2021
Ride the North Idaho Centennial Trail
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Live Coeur d'Alene Team at Live Coeur d'Alene
Ride The North Idaho Centennial Trail in Cd'A

North Idaho Centennial Trail: Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

No Idaho bucket list is complete without riding the North Idaho Centennial Trail. This article will cover what the trail is, where you can then access it, and all the other details needed to enjoy this Northern Idaho (and Spokane) favorite.

The North Idaho Centennial Trail is a beautiful 23-mile-long trail trafficked by walkers, hikers, and bike riders. Featuring class 1 and 2 paved trails, users of the North Idaho Centennial Trail can enjoy a long trail free of vehicle traffic but still maintain all the benefits of smooth paved surfaces. Whether you want a nice long run while prepping for your next race or a scenic bike trail to put in those 20+ miles needed, the NICT has what you are looking for. 

The NICT takes users along Lake Coeur d’Alene, winds through downtown CDA and then treks 23 miles west towards the Washington State line. Should you want a little more distance, simply stay on the trail in Washington and go for another 39 miles into Spokane, WA. 


Where is the North Idaho Centennial Trail?

Coeur d’Alene is primarily home to the North Idaho Centennial Trail. The trail starts at the end of Coeur d’Alene Parkway or Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive road, known to some.

Through miles of varying trail types, the NICTF connects through Post Falls, ID, across the border into Liberty Lake, and over the Washington border, just 6 miles west of Coeur d’Alene.

The trail extends over 20 miles into Washington state, connecting to the Spokane River Centennial Trail at the Idaho and Washington state lines.

Accessing from Coeur d’Alene

Accessing the NICT from CDA is not only easy but highly convenient. To access the trail from CDA, users can start at the North Idaho Centennial Trail trailhead, which can be accessed at many of the 15 different parking areas along the trail from Higgins Point at Lake Coeur d’Alene to the Washington State line at Spokane Bridge. 

Accessing From Spokane

If you are planning on accessing the North Idaho Centennial Trail from the western side of Spokane, access is just as easy! Users of the trail can easily access parking at the Spokane Bridge, which connects to the Spokane River Centennial Trail. Additionally, if you are already coming from the Spokane River Centennial Trail, users can also find ample parking opportunities along this trail. 


Does The NICT Have Any Rules?

The trail has a few rules/restrictions that should be observed when recreating the trail. Below are some of the most common and essential rules to be aware of and remember to respect:

  • Keep to the right of the trail
  • Alcoholic beverages prohibited
  • Pedestrians have right-of-way
  • All users remain on designated trails
  • Bicycle speed limit:15 mph
  • Maximum of two bicycle riders abreast at any time; if pedestrians are present, only one allowed
  • Pets must be on a leash
  • Do not disturb plants or animals
  • Pack-it-in/Pack-it-out
  • No structures, including vending equipment, are allowed
  • No motorized vehicles are allowed on the trail
  • Camping is prohibited

NICT Conclusion

Once again, CDA offers outdoor enthusiasts just one more reason to get outside in the fresh air and enjoy all the beauty and active recreation surrounding Coeur d’Alene. Hopefully, this article helped you better understand what the North Idaho Centennial Trail is, the location, and how to make the most of using it to your outdoor recreation advantage. We will see you out on the trail!